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of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training such as verbal commands and we also have outlined many incidents of litigation that have occurred... >> just some follow up questions. did you ever get a response from the mayor on your letter? >> no, we did not. >> and any of the staff in >> no. >> i think that the letter was actually really well done and it is well documented and there are a number of citations in here, do you recall what i read to commander ali, right now, referencing how it looks to be when tasers are involved in working with people who have mental health i
movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i think that george's, george's proclivities were always in and around social justice. i know that he was raised catholic. so was i. 16 years of catholic school has made me the man i am today. [laughter] >> and harvey influenced by jewish culture, you know, i don't think it's ever been explored enough. but if you talk to every brit, you know that harvey was a very, very much impacted by the holocaust. you know, if you remember, it happened in the '40s. it's only 20 years or so since he came onto the scene. and i think he was able to transfer, you know, that tragedy and that oppression into what was happening with gay people. he was very scrappy. i wanted to acknowledge two people who were very supportive of harvey milk and george moscone, and both of them have left us and that's howard wallace and hank wilson. (applause) >> what i loved about them was, what i loved about them was they knocked back a few and really get into it with harvey abo
're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions so you don't get to talk anymore. for the rest of the four panellests whoever keep its to two to three minute
. and, of course, their own country, lawyers have experience a lot of pain in the civil rights movement. so my question is, in line with the comment about practical steps, what would be a facing of the introduction of the rule of law that might be suggested to the chinese government and to chinese political and legal leaders as a way to avoid these calamitous events and bring about the rule of law? >> can you suggest to them that they pay the judges and say we will reducers our, we won't fire you? they might be willing to do that. and after they did that, you know, judges would love it, and nobody else would like it. but i mean, they would do, or maybe they would say we have an administrative law grow here. by the way, let's have all the corporate cities on television. the proceeding, i'm not saying the deliberations. why don't he they do that? let's not get into that. 5 let's have the trials and all those things. they do that. maybe they would, or maybe, what about this arbitration resolving business differences, would you be willing to take some the judges? after all, you're not payin
was such an effective pay per liter. this is a great champion of civil rights. he runs for president under the progressive party ticket in 1952. fbi goes after with everything they have. he's turned in prison on trumped up tax charges twice, but he raises the sprawling brood of chuck irish kids. terence hallinan who miss in this neighborhood, brother patrick, lawyers themselves and of course da of san francisco. the only da, by the way, who was given a hot fix for janis joplin of hair heroin and latest bid to become da of san francisco. so this is a book that really told it self i have to say. these stories and characters are truly larger than life. >> just after that, make japan yen and brian rohan worked in hallinan's office and they were the guys who started halo, he had ran out of the dads front hollar, a victorian house. they were providing legal services to other kids that got bested in the neighborhood. >> is true. since hallinan was the godfather for whole new generation to brian and michael and also tony sir who went on to defend among other things the critters commune with their
. and prepared surveillance and precautionary measures. some civil rights groups are upset that the protests were viewed as criminal acts. the f-b-i says it recognizes the rights of groups to engage in peaceful protests, but must also deal with potential threat of violence. >> los angeles has moved up its annual gun buyback program in the wake of this month's shooting rampage in connecticut. people can drop off their guns in exchange for a grocery store gift card -- no questions asked. the mayor says the city's residents want to be proactive >> they want to act they're tired of waiting on congress and on legislators to do something. there is too much talk and not enough action this is an opportunity for people to act and get rid of guns they do not need. or do not use. all too often, the guns are stolen. >> the city destroys the guns it is given. since the buy back program started in 2009, los angeles has collected eight thousand weapons. can breathe. during superstorm sandy. it's the thought that counts, but sometimes that thought misses the mark. if you're hitting the mall or trekking to the p
and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ear, would you mind giving a lecture at washi
, civil rights attorney and law professor in washington and richard herman, new york criminal defense attorney and law professor, joins us from las vegas. avery, is there any room for gun control here? >> yeah. a ton of it. miguel, that 2008 decision that you referred to, that case really provided the open door. even justice scalia, one of the most conservative members of the court and writing for the majority, talked about unusual and dangerous weapons being permitted to be regulated. so i think heller really offers congress an opportunity to get serious, show some backbone, take advantage of the existing constitutional law, what the tragedy means, what comes out of connecticut, and take action in dealing with arms regulation. i think the opportunity is there. i think they can get it done. >> richard, what would meaningful gun control legislation or laws look like that would get by the supreme court? >> that's a great question, miguel. we're going to find that out in the next year or so. justice scalia also talked about the enshrinement of our constitutional right to bear arms. in an
long ago. that's 34 years after the 1964 civil rights act. according to the latest census, one in four americans describe themselves as being something other than black. african-americans are not the largest minority group anymore. they have not been for a while. latinos are a larger minority group. neither one of them is the fastest growing racial minority group. the fastest growing one is asian american. white americans are growing only had a 5.7% rate. another rapidly growing group of people like our president. who could check more than one box in the race and ethnicity section of their questionnaire. it seems to me that we cannot have a legal regime that sorts people according to their skin color and what country their ancestors came from. and treat some people better and other people worse based on what boxley check. okay? now, frequently the people who are arguing in favor, and i think this issue all the time, let me tell you. two minutes and today we are not talking about the educational benefits within a conversation. we are talking about slavery. we are talking about racial di
. civil rights movement. our country came through each struggle stronger.
was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [laughter] >> you and the friend sold bumper stickers for robert kennedy. >> yes. >> and buttons and other things. >> for those of us who lived through it and remember, that was a time of great turmoil, but al
previous to this what was a study of the civil-rights south and the integration of james meredith at the university of ole miss. i like to pick out subjects that i feel have a lot of resonance to our cultural history, biography, and -- >> paul hendrickson's most recent book, national book
about civil-rights. the second part of your question, how did he get kennedy -- it takes a lot of pages in this book to talk about all the things he does but the thing he does on the instant, this bill appears to be totally dead. he says didn't someone file a discharge petition? discharge petition had been filed -- this bill was in a committee that was never going to let it out. wasn't even the senate. still in the house rules committee which was shared by judge howard w. smith and would even give a date. the bill was going nowhere. johnson remembers someone filed a discharge petition to take away from that committee. that was -- a discharge petition ever -- never passed. violation of house rules and no president had ever gotten behind one before. johnson calls the representative who introduces it and representative of missouri has been told by the leaders dropped this thing and listen to johnson in this telephone call to see a genius in human nature because the first half of the call, we can't violate the house precedents. then up next on booktv after words with this guest host richard
was not fired because she is a woman. our civil rights laws and all other laws are not intended to create a remedy for every slight or per sooeceived injustice. dr. knight fired her to preserve not only his marriage but also his own marriage. the reality is that he repeatedly directed her to dress and behave in an appropriate way and she chose not to. he responded in the way that his ministers and wife felt was necessary to protect the sanctity of his marriage and hers. bottom line is she was not fired because she is a woman. he has never employed anyone other than women in his practice. dr. knight chose to fafr the wishes of his weave and to end mrs. nelson's employment. his decision was both the legal and morally just thing to do. so it's cold out there, really. and this time of year, the one place you definitely don't want to be is in boston harbor. watch this. that man there is a police officer, edward norton, captured jump into a freezing fort point channel in a downpour to rescue a woman who had fallen in. >> one of the other officers had been given a life preservers prosecute someo
-rise of downtown san francisco. the employment law and civil rights attorney is seen smiling in pictures in his office with president obama and former president clinton. he wanted nothing to do with our camera. we trying to track down those who owe the state. mccoy is also a former san francisco ethics commissioner, once tasked with keeping politicians honest now he's facing his own ethical tax dilemma. is it fair that folks like you don't pay your fair share? >> i pay my fair share. i pay all of my taxes as i can. so, that's all i got to say. >> reporter: the san francisco attorney told us in a letter today that he is working with the franchise tax board to pay his bill. mccoy is just one in a long list of californians on the hook for back taxes. we reviewed the top 500 deadbeats and found respected professionals including other lawyers, doctors, realtor and nurses. hollywood celebrities clueing dionne warwick and steven. we couldn't find him but here on main street in hayward -- we confronted another tax evadetor. >> you and your husband owes the state. >> reporter: the franchise tax board
to that is lbj with the southern democrats passing civil rights in the '60s, which is that it was really only lbj in certain ways who could be the person to sell that vote to democrats because of where he came from. >> see, i feel like the fact that he doesn't have weight with the rest of his caucus, with the sort of -- where he needs to have it with his caucus right now is not so much ideological. i think it's a crisis of authority on the republican side. i don't think anybody, no matter where they were on the ideological number line could move republicans in a leadership role, because i don't think republicans in the house believe in following leadership anymore. anybody who is in leadership by definition is the man. they're an insurgent party. you should never go along. going along -- being part of the larger number of people doing the thing as a group marks you as suspect in the first place. i don't think anybody could hold the job. >> you know, thing is something to that culturally. the irony to that of course is newt gingrich initiated this revolution in which he changed the culture to be v
for granted, three great civil rights laws, medicare, just the vibrancy in those tapes, all you have to do is listen and he's back alive again swearing and being the most fascinating person that i've ever met in public life. and the books are helping because they create this giant character. he deserves it. >> and giant situations in front of him the way he came in as well as the way he left. >> a giant character and also -- >> dark clouds. >> you were there closely with him, but also so complicated. our relationships with our presidents are so personal, and the fact is he accomplished remarkable things politically. and yet you never get through a couple of pages of carol's books where you go, ew, this was not a good guy. >> i don't think -- that's not true. i disagree that he's not a good guy. he's a strange guy. >> they're all strange. >> there are not many presidents that take you into the bathroom and talk to you while they're in the bathroom. >> not enough. >> there's not many presidents that when he talks to you violates the normal human space between people so your head is right up
correctness or what. >> a sen of a person's civil rights. >> a lack of awareness. we're teaching men the way to
steps have been take ton resolve the dispute. >>> the end of a career of one long time civil rights leader. carl snoweden will retire january 8th. the office made the announcement friday. this decision comes against some legal problems for snoweden. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date next month for violating his probation in a drunk driving case. >>> one minute he's out, the next he's back in. that roller coaster ride for morgan state university president david wilson appears to be over. yesterday the board agreed to renew his contract. >> shortly after the vote, dr. david wilson told us he is honored morgan state university's board renewed their confidence in him by extending his contract to june 2014. friday's decision comes a few weeks after the board voted to oust him as president, a situation he blames himself for. >> i'm the president of the institution, and so as president, you know, the buck stops in the president's office. and so certainly whatever transpired here, i'll be the first one to raise my hand and say, i'll own it. >> he promi
of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely shattered. i don't know how many of you have taken a trip to the coroner's office to look at the most important person in your life with five bullets in their body. let me tell you, when they lie there lifeless,
and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special account told by janet reno -- special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ea
will run at 186 miles per hour. >>> and civil rights icon nelson mandela has been discharged from a south africa hospital. 94-year-old former president will continue treatment at his home. he was hospitalized with a lung infection on december 8th. one week later, he had surgery to remove gallstones. i'm sure everyone's pleased to hear that he's doing well. >> thanks so much for that, lisa. >>> in the wake of the connecticut school shooting, the nr after the wants to put armed volunteers in every american school. the proposal facing heavy criticism. the man in charge is here to defend it. plus how the host of nbc's "meet the press" may have broken washington, d.c. gun laws. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkabl
was with the civil rights legislation figured that out. both sides need to come together again, it's on president obama, harry reid and the tea party. >> jamie: let's get michael in here. michael, at this point what can the president do? he's on vacation and the american people are wondering, they're selling off houses, selling off stock. they don't know what next year looks like. >> in the interest of communication, not where the president is at christmas, but speaker boehner basically asked harry reid to figure out how to get a package that he can get 100 republican votes in the house of representatives on and harry reid is very good at figuring out the compromise that angela just talked about. i completely agree with angela's point, that the tea party has the speaker held hostage. a half dozen members or so, under no circumstances can we vote for taxes even on people over a million dollars, so i predict that we probably get over the cliff and that allows republicans to say, well, i only voted to cut taxes for 99%. i hope they get it done the second after it enacts so people don't feel it in th
worse. the revolutionary war. civil war. pearl harbor. civil rights movement. our country came through each struggle stronger.
look at the civil rights movement, that started with emmittville, montgomery. montgomery was supposed to be a boycott. people on the ground who begin to drive this issue. the conversation can't start in washington. washington is an aftereffect. it has to start with the people in various places driving them to move. if that doesn't happen, they will not move. >> you're absolutely right. that is the history of movements in america. but there is going to be a bill we know senator dianne feinstein is going to introduce a bill on the first day of the new congress. why shouldn't more folks get behind that, including some republicans? because i'd like to remind you of one thing. justice scalia said in the heller decision, like most rights the second amendment is not unlighted. -- not unlimited. he said, it is not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever for whatever purpose. from the high priest of the supreme court of conservatism himself. why doesn't that create some room for current conservatives like ronald reagan did in 1994 to back an assault weapons ban
of the civil rights movement, and the life or death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> that is caroline kennedy on a discussion of the 1952 recordings of the late president in the oval office. that is tuesday evening at 7:00 p.m. on c-span2. >> next, prime minister david cameron talks about the 3800 british troops that will be withdrawn from afghanistan by the end of 2013. he added that a small number of troops would remain to return equipment and work at an officer training academy. members also asked about the uk's immigration policy. also proposed health services spending cuts. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >>
states, war has been an engine of civil right. because you might be able to afford the waste of human resources involved in discrimination against a race or class or gender in peace time. when you have to rally resources of the nation to take on a crisis like the civil war, like world war ii, you need everybody. pretty quickly by the end of 1862, you have women running the entire public health system, towards the and clara barton were important figures in washington and airways -- there was when the soldiers needing treatment and there was no preparation for them. and these partially women volunteers created the response. i wasn't the war department. linking you see and has laconic patience and very pragmatic way adjusting to these new realities every day. these dichotomies and lichen, a very important one was this huge fish and over three generations from now will be richer from europe and the lazio at the same time would say, look, i don't know from day to day what i am going to be dealing with. my goal is to get from morning to night each day and do what thomas problems i say. one
, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lot more to it than that, but i'll leave it at that, and learn from his circumstances but had this to say about his trial -- nobody who covered the case or reported it had the time or took the time study the allegations, the accusere accuserers, the inconsistent, and the method. justice and fairness were
on black exceptionalism has been a problem in the post-civil rights era. racial progress is too often determined by the exceptional success of people such as barack obama and oprah winfrey." and she makes a great point there, but at the same time can they be representative of the aspirations of the group at the same time? her point is brilliant but -- joe louis represented our interests. >> sure. sometimes exceptionalism works against the african-american community. but also they reflect our current moment. there's something to be said about the way race operates here and reflects our society today. >> dr. james peterson, thank you so much. that's "the ed show." i'm michael eric dyson in for ed schultz. "the rachel maddow show" starts right now. ezra klein is filling in for rachel tonight. not django. good evening, ezra. >> good evening, michael. thank you very much. and thank you to you at home for sticking around for the next hour. rachel has a well-deserved night off. but today on the senate there was a rare sighting on the senate floor. especially around this time of year. right n
, there are incredible civil rights conversations in this book that kind of take you through the most dramatic moments from the desegregation of ole miss and then birmingham and then kind of working with, figuring out the relationship with the leaders of the movement. and it's unbelieve -- you look back and you think some of this progress was inevitable, and this really shows you how incredibly difficult and tense it was. >> this is a breathtaking historical document. >> it really is. >> this is no one's interpretation of what happened 50 years ago. it's history as it happened. how did you get access to the tapes, first of all, and how do you whittle down a presidency to a few hours? >> well, the tapes have been opened over the years, with the last ones -- there's a few in this book that haven't been released before. but they've been available, but they're just -- they're raw data just like any research archive. and so we wanted to make them accessible in a way that people could digest it, that they could hear it. so we picked when we wanted to place it in context because it's the 50th anniversary, an
the tense confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions been made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy and a discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. as we continue to the holiday on c-span2. >> as president obama begins his second term in office, what are the most important issues to consider for 2013? >> make a short message for the president. >> joined the student can competition -- student cam competition. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> supreme court justice stephen breyer was recently at the brookings institution to talk about his new book. he also discussed china and the history of the u.s. constitution. this is just over an hour. >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, um we started -- about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when
martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running f mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got i early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and the were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [laughter] >> you and the friend sold bumper stickers for robert kennedy. >> yes. >> and buttons and other things. >> for those of us who lived through it and remember, that was a time of
confrontations of the civil rights movement and a life or death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy in a discussion in the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. tuesday at 8:00 p.m. eastern as a book tv continues on c-span2. >> the senate returns for legislative session on thursday. the house has a pro forma session scheduled that day. it will work on two bills. the first is on the fisa act. the other is a relief package for those areas affected by hurricane sandy. live work on the senate are companion network c-span2. and discussions continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. negotiations continue. nobel laureate and a burmese opposition leader aung san suu kyi accepted the congressional gold medal in september. she said it represents the aspirations of the burmese people for a democratic transition. we will also hear from secretary of state hillary clinton and former first lady laura bush. >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> ladies and all men, good afterno
and christine gregoire from washington, why in. >> two governors leading an important new civil right struggle, the civil rights struggle of our generation, many feel as i do, and they helped spearhead the effort to gain marriage equality in their state, in washington state and maryland this year. they did it against the odds and knowing that there would be a referendum, a voter referendum if they pushed the legislatures into this and knowing also that marriage equality had never been approved in a voter referendum. they led that fight against the odds and as a result the citizens of their state are better off and have more fairness and more equality in their states this year. >> anna, you also chose a governor from your party as well, chris christie. >> dana, you know he was on the nice list when my democrat colleague and friend richard chose him on the nice list, too, so when richard and i are agreeing it tells you the man was nice. >> although i think chris christie could have been on my naughty list, too, ana. >> and i think he'd be happy with that, too. what chris christie did this year d
, an did. this is for the marriage and sanctity of the family. gregg: did you read the iowa civil rights act? >> probably some time in 1991 when i was preparing for the new york bar. gregg: if you bothered to read the law you would have noticed that all you have to do is prove that gender is a factor, one factor, that's all. joey? >> arthur loves when i say this so i'm going to say it, this is outrageous. this is a blow to family values everywhere. when they couched the decision, that is the court in terms of family values. what about the values of this woman? what about equality, what about decency. what about respecting women and not treating them as objects. this decision goes too far. but consider the source, gregg, it was a decision mailed pwaoeupb seven males, which speaks to the need of having diversity on that court. when we look at the court's decision if it were not for our agenda mr. aidala she would have not been terminated. >> this was a woman running a law practice and one of her men was interfering with her marriage she could fire him as well. >> note hat gregg: the iowa c
with the assassination of john f. kennedy by using it to pass the civil rights act of 1964 and used the assassination of martin luther king to pass the civil rights act of 1968 better known as the fair housing act. >> so it seems like today, if you're looking at the assassination of bobby kennedy as being a tipping point for lbj, it seems like we have something similar on an emotional level here in the u.s. with regard to newtown and what's happened there. so if president obama wanted to take a lesson from 1968, what do you think he could learn from how lbj got the votes for the bill? >> well, again, lbj used the emotional tipping point, as you suggested, alex, to get this through. one of the things he did very effectively is he worked with great speed, with great swiftness in order to get things done. before the mood of the country turned to something else. it's interesting. if you look at 1968, mrs. johnson, lady bird johnson, wrote in her diary, there are so many people across this country who are asking what is happening to us. president johnson felt that as well, and that's when he moved on gun
for the civil rights struggle and the children's crusade in 1963. but what is he able to do in birmingham in a way that challenges what we think about this. >> he did not want to be a farmer. he did not want to be a sharecropper. this is a place that early on was that segregated. we think about her manhattan is misrepresented -- but the office, when he first appears in the census as a homeowner has white neighbors end up with that, not the time. it was a place where someone who wanted to make his mark at at the field could do that. >> so he buys property? >> he buys property. >> another property owner. >> between you and me again -- >> s., make and found office. >> he really is an amazing carrier chair and he becomes for you one of the most distant relatives who has this amazing story. but you also find people you interview the new doll face and also new melvina. so tell us how you were able to write about melvina life. >> one of the amazing things has been able to find people who actually knew melvina can a woman born in
and the work of the civil rights activist in the 1960s. and thomas mann and norm ornstein on their book of partisanship in congress. >> the tension builds in one of the things that happens during that time is that a soviet submarine is found by american ships. and there are charges on a soviet submarine. a knock out the electrical system. the carbon dioxide is rising. people are passing out inside the submarine. they have no communication with the commander. the commander loads the torpedo, the war started already in the war is starting. they want to launch the nuclear torpedo. fortunately, one of the other commanders on the ship from a lower rank talked him out of it. it might have saved the world. >> of this is so close to the edge. it really was one of the scariest moments after this. >> they said we didn't notice. honestly, we were teenagers. my god, we wouldn't even be here to talk. >> director oliver stone and peter koznick of the untold history of united states senator nunn on 10:00 p.m. eastern on booktv's "after words." part of four days of nonfiction authors and books through
on campus led to his initial ousting. >>> a rough end to the career of a maryland civil rights pioneer tp the director of civil rights for the maryland attorney general's office will retire january 8th. the ag's office made that announcement friday. the decision comes amid some legal problems for snowden. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date next month for violating his probation in a drufrn driving case. >>> the man brutally beaten on christmas day believes he was the victim of a hate crime. according to a police report, 30-year-old kenny shaw had just left the liquor store at east hoffman and milton streets. he was only a block away when a group of five or six men surrounded him. additional blows followed. he also tells 11 news that he was taunted weeks ago and he thinks he was targeted this time. >> i feel like it was a hate crime because i am homosexual. like i said, i do stand out. >> police are now investigating this case and detectives say they have some good leads in what they are now calling an assault at this point. we're back in jus >> well,
of the 1964 civil rights act. not all of it, just the problem part. i say there's only one -- [inaudible] in this so i'm not picking and choosing. quote: no person in the unite shall on the -- in the united states shall on the basis of color or national origin be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. that's what happened to abigail fisher. it's not disputed. she was treated different lit because of -- differently because of her race, color and national origin. now, we're not going to be talking so much about title vi tomorrow, we're going to be talking about the constitution because the supreme court said, well, that doesn't really mean what it says, you know? we think that it just means what the constitution means. and the constitution is, you know, has a little more egg l room,al -- wiggle l room,al l though not a lot. the constitution outlawed, i mean, the whole purpose of the equal protection or the 14th amendment was to outlaw racially-separate legal standards. that seems pretty straightforward too. and, you k
commitment to their civil rights. is that an acceptable apology in your opinion? are opposedthe wide ranging to mr. heigle right now. i think the human rights campaign, the leading gay rights activist groups in washington is opposed to him. this morning chuck schumer, a distinguished senator from the president's own party refused to come out on the record to support mr. heigle as did joe lieberman. it is not just conservatives or republicans who are opposed to mr. hoegle -- mr. heigle. >> real quick, he is known to be a con terror yen and out of the box thinker. does that explain these comments? >> perhaps it does, but america's fighting troops don't need a contraian. they need a leader. >> representative, we will see you when the new session gets underway in january. >> thanks. merry christmas. >> you too. >>> former solicitor general robert borke has been laid to rest. former federal judge i should say. he was nominated by president ronald reagan, but the senate rejected the nome make with a consider -- rejected the nomination by a wide margin. he was battling heart conditions and pulmonar
contributor and civil rights and law professor avery friedman. morning, avery. >> good morning, carol. >> i think the thing that stands out for most people is that this man was convicted of murder for killing his grandmother who was 92 years old. apparently he beat her to death and he was on parole. he only served 17 years. how is that possible? >> yeah, it seems impossible to happen. but if you study this, spengler was in his late 20s when he committed this murder. and one would expect that he would have spent the rest of his life in the new york penal system. the fact is, though, that he was paroled out and actually had an obligation to report to his parole officer until this happened. but the fact is that it struck me as virtually impossible for the parole department not to know that this guy was a problem. the fact that he committed this murder -- again, even though he was in his 20s, unless he was a model person in the penitentiary, it would seem pretty obvious that there was a problem with this guy and of course the worst happened here. and we will never know, although we do tend to t
is greater than one who is in the world. there is a wonderful spiritual i was taught in the civil rights movement. fingerprints will treat me like they used to. since i lay my burden down. way down the burden of prejudice and narrowmindedness. it's a huge burden to lay down. there will be a time when the friends you had a special treat you like they used to. and accessing what my friend teaches me about consciousness. >> to access that. i was reading this while doing my cardio in "the new york times." and i said, it came to me. we shouldn't be burning carranza, we should be reading carranza. so we put together this program of three of my closest muslim friends and talk about what it means to me. and lalo came and spoke. i asked her why she does what she does. and she said, it is to keep my consciousness of god to alive. i think that's what we're talking about in part. keeping that a lie. would which you know will never abandon you and your friends. >> is their phone you wanted to and with? in this beautiful conversation? >> why don't you do that. >> these are yours. out beyond ideas of w
've always been passionate about politics. everyone back in my ear was. it was the height of the civil rights movement. the vietnam war and there are some issues to become engaged in and started moving up the ladder and in turn that a local on news station and that is the end of the violin. >> and then he kept working at it and loved it? >> it was not quite that simple. it was in a day when they simply did not hire women for newsroom jobs in broadcasting. there were a few anchor women and whether women. not average general assignment reporters. i could go into advertising or promotion. i was accepted in the corporate management training program. i said hire me as a copy boy. which is what they called them. this was back in the days of fell and television. it was a very different era. they gave me the midnight to 8:00 shift. if i prove myself there, maybe -- i worked my way up to becoming a reporter. i'm sure there were far more barriers for you. barriers for you.
is greater than the one who is in the world. and there's a wonderful spiritual that i was taught in the civil rights movement that sings friends don't treat me like they used to since i laid my burden down. and to lay down the burden of prejudice and narrow mindedness is a huge burden to lay down. and there will be a time when those friends you had as friends don't treat you like they used to. and just accessing what my friend leyla teaches me about god can consciousness. -- god consciousness. >> yeah. >> to access that. when this florida pastor wanted to burn the qurans, i said, i was in the gym on a bike, you know, doing my cardio, and i was reading this -- [laughter] and in "the new york times," and i said -- and it came to me we shouldn't be burning qurans, we should be reading qurans. so we put together this program of three of my closest muslim friends to come and talk about what the quran means to me. and leyla came and spoke, and i asked her why she does what he does, and she said, oh, it's to keep my godnessness alive. and i think -- god consciousness alive which you know will never
which has put the economic question front and center. unlike the civil-rights and feminists and many other important movements of our time where there was fear of going in that direction, they were not ready for it, the police would be angry and arrest of a. this is a movement that's that we are putting the question of the 1% and 99% front and center. that opens a space that this book is not doable without the space opened by occupy wall street or the interests. if i am correct in understanding this, its third printing and it only appeared in may of this year, the thanks go to the people like the occupy wall street people who are willing to break from the tradition not to be limited by the end dumb ~ either/or republican and democrat and are willing to push in another direction. >> another question on the occupy movement, what has happened to it? it seems to have gone into some sort recess for stasis. >> a great political leader of the left whose name i won't mention because it frightens people is well known for having said political movements do not develop in a straight line. it do
] there was no title vii. i graduated in 1959. title vii under the civil rights act was in 1964, all on discrimination on the basis -- outlawed discrimination on the basis of discrimination -- religion, and sex. and 1950s, law firms, and some of the finest graduates were saying they wanted no women. they would feel uncomfortable dealing with a woman, or as often her, we hired a woman at this from once, and she was dreadful. how many men did they hire that didn't work out? so it wasn't easy to get that first job. first job was all important because if you got it and performed well, then the next job was secure. well, i had a great professor, someone may know you -- some of you may know his name, he was the first constitutional law scholar, and he was in charge of getting judicial clerkship for columbia law school students. and i was special. he was determined to give me a federal clerkship. so he recommended me to a judge who always hired his law clerks from columbia. and then -- [inaudible] is ruth bader ginsburg. she has a four year old daughter. how can i rely on her? and the professor said, give he
, of the civil rights movement, of guns and drugs being brought into the community. so i think one of the things that our community can offer is a sense of solidarity first of all and second, community. i think community is very important. part of what's going on with this whole gun thing, it's about individual rights. we have forgotten about what community means. so when the african-american community comes together, whether in church or the community center or something like that, and we say we're going to stand against the violence, we're going to stand and march in our communities, we're going to talk about this, we're going to bring kids in and try to give events for them and all that, it is a holistic kind of way to think about how to deal with violence. i want to just say one more thing. i think this is a really important point. what people don't understand about religious people who like their guns is that guns, god and the constitution for them go all together. they are wrapped into this sort of sacred way of thinking about the nation, thinking about god, thinking about what their guns
to stand up and say, this is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet movement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage in order to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people are below their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate because we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate
way. we hear the tense confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life-or- death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy joins "listening in" editor ted widmer in a discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office, tuesday evening at 7:00, as "book tv" continues through the holiday on c-span2. >> i was 9 and i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay, who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party. [laughter] i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york. and a woman thought this was really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsey. got an early start on my political consulting career. i made the case against his opponent as well. [laughter] she said, "that's so cute." she said, "this is for you." she hands me a box of what looked to be pastries, a white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters
of the civil rights movement and the life or death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy joins "listening in" editor on the discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president from office. tuesday evening at 7:00 in eastern on c-span2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we want to welcome back to our table, bill bennett. let's just continue the conversation we were having with our viewers. does religion and flow of your politics? guest: sure, i think it influences a lot of people's politics. daniel patrick moynihan, a democrat senator from new york, one of the great men of the senate -- george will things he was the model of will a senator should be -- taught us all that culture is more important than politics and terms of moving a society. political leaders in politics can alter the culture. we can see that effect, too. but culture really affects politics more than a big part of the culture is religion, what people believe. the best example i can think of would be martin luther king, jr.. he was a minister of the christian faith. he had a p
're really going to do it. and sometimes it sort of takes in social movements, whether civil rights, anything historically it takes a certain amount of push at the beep ginning to get the momentum started and many years of struggling and then some other big event at the end to sort of push us over the top. and i think we may have seen that. i'm especially hopeful that gun owners and gun supporters who want to have guns can get together and say -- and the polls show this is true and say yes we want to have our guns but we also want to do sensible things too. we don't want to see our children dying. let's quit fighting about whether to have this and sit down at the table and come up with thing that is any sensible person can agree to and let's do those things. host: one more call. this one from mark in florida on our line for republicans. caller: i would just like to thank you for your rational discussion on the subject. i agree, and i pray that we've reached a tipping point like last friday i cried like you and i don't pretend to be an expert on any of this i'm just a concerned citizen. and i
in the south. one of the things that happened after the civil rights movement is we saw more and more of the institutions that were about political education, that were not just about pipelining black, particularly blooek leaders who were going to look at and develop an understand the policies that were necessary for the black community. in order for it to thrive. we have actually seen a demobilization of that infrastructure. so when we have this conversation like 30% of blaeks voting for strom thurmond, one of the things we have to think about is, we're responding to, this is the guy that made the phone call or wrote the letter that helped me out. it's a different kind of political education and engagement than saying -- what actually fixes some of the things that we need fixed in our community? how are we assessing our political leadership on that basis? that's something that's actually extremely important and we've been seeing less and less of it in many black communities. >> i want to agree with my friend, mayor reed. the republican party is a learning party and it knows it has to
senator alan simpson. after that congressman john lewis on the civil-rights activist work in the 1960s and later congressional scholar thomas mann and norman ornsetein in their partnership in congress. >> author edward klein joined booktv at freedom fest to talk about his new york times best selling book "the amateur". he looks critically at president obama before and after he reached the white house. here is what he had to say. >> the book currently on your screen has spent several weeks on the new york times best-seller list, many weeks at number one. "the amateur" has been written by edward klein who is our guest, booktv on c-span2. where did you get a title for this book? >> guest: it came from a meeting bill clinton had in chapel:00, new york, north of new york city where he has a home. this was back in august of 2011. his wife, his daughter and a bunch of friends to meet with him because he had news. he had done a secret poll in 2011 and polls showed if hillary clinton would challenge barack obama for the democratic presidential nomination in 2012, he thought she could win. she w
reckon he'd aim to go where she was? - i said get! - all right, i'm getting. no use getting mad about it. keep a civil tongue in your head. that's no way to talk to an old man. huh. [suspenseful music] ♪ - don't shoot. please, mister. - there was an old prospector in your store today. - i didn't tell him anything, so help me. - why not? - well, i--i don't know anything. - you don't know who killed pete ramirez? - no, i don't. - you sure? - i don't know who killed him. - then what could you have told that old prospector but didn't? [gun cocks] - all right. about the dynamite. - dynamite? - there. you got it out of me. cassidy sent you to find out if you could. tell him i never asked to handle the gol-darn stuff. mr. kilgore ordered it. why can't he order things like that right there in his own town, right there in brasada? what's all the big secret about? [dramatic music] ♪ [drumming] ♪ - tonto, those drums are summoning the tribes to war. - that plenty bad, kemo sabay. ranchers talk war all time. indians make ready. soon war start, and they fight, fight. - not if we can stop them.
leaders say the constitution takes away many of their rights. in syria's civil war, rebel forces appear to be gaining ground against the assad regime. sctivists say the rebels captured the town of harem along the turkish border after a cttle that lasted four weeks. the rebels had already captured other towns in the area and at least three military bases. thpe benedict spoke up today for the 40,000 killed in syria in inarly two years of fighting. ,n his christmas address, he denounced the slaughter of the defenseless. inialso urged palestinians and israelis to find the courage to negotiate. the housing industry is coming back, and guess who is on a buying spree? and this could be a huge advance in space flight. spreusable rocket. when the cbs evening news continues. continues. if you have high blood pressure and get a cold get coricidin hbp. the number one pharmacist recommended cold brand designed for people with high blood pressure. and the only one i use to relieve my cold symptoms without raising my blood pressure. coricidin hbp. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bl
disputes. things like the civil rights fights of the 1960s. now it is routine. it requires really 60 votes to do anything in the senate. we have this intense level of party line voting with the filibuster. it's like a parliament system without majority rule. then you have the informal analog to that in the house which the majority party says, we're not going to bring anything up. it has to have 218 votes but it has to have a majority of the majority which gives a veto to the republican wing of the conservative party. that's where we'restick stuck right now. >> let's bring in lisa dejardan. is there in this particular case -- >> reporter: i'm hesitant to get into it because it gets into senate procedure. the simplest would be if the leaders agree not to invoke that 60-vote requirement. if they agree a majority would be enough. for that to work, the rest of the senate would then have to essentially allow it to. there would have to be no one that attempts a filibuster. that's the easiest way to get around the 60 votes. another way is to possibly use some sort of budget measure that could be p
in the house and create an internal civil war. he has done that right up until now obama has what he wanted which is a partisan political success. he has been less worried about the fiscal issue for two reasons number one he does not care about debt. he hasn't in the four years, and number two, he thinks he's a political winner if we go over the cliff. he thinks he's holding all of the cards. >>> house gop leaders have decided to have the house of representatives turn on sunday evening just in case there's a deal made in the final hours. >>> now to some stories you can bank on this morning. time is running out for struggling homeowners to get some free help fighting possible wrongful foreclosures. in a deal for the fox business network joins us to explain. >> a little more time but time running out. >> the four million homeowners foreclosed on from 09 to 10 government sent out a letter to them a year ago 4 million. they have until monday to sign up for a free review of the foreclosure make sure there's no mistake see if they are going to be compensated for any errors. 100 bucks maybe 100,00
the rebel yell right out of the civil war. one of the rangers said it was one of the most glorious moments to be a ranger. as they charged across the field was the perfect time. the artillery was now falling on the germans rather than a sunken road. was the perfect window of opportunity and they seized the pillboxes and went up the hill. what happens next is unbelievable. with hardly any men they started out with roughly 120 men, they lost many men in the charge, lost men, ran up the hill, i have been to this place and toward it with a german veterans, ran up the hill and took the pillbox that was on top of the hill which was the main center of gravity because it offered protection and the protection it offered was from the artillery. picture a rainstorm but instead of raindrops it with shrapnel and tree splitters. 18 battalions of german artillery rained down on that hill, killing germans and americans alike. it became unbearable. on top of that, within half an hour, 45 minutes, the germans according to their doctor and began to power back. they hit it with company strength or more. somet
? - i said get! - all right, i'm getting. no use getting mad about it. keep a civil tongue in your head. that's no way to talk to an old man. huh. [suspenseful music] ♪ - don't shoot. please, mister. - there was an old prospector in your store today. - i didn't tell him anything, so help me. - why not? - well, i--i don't know anything. - you don't know who killed pete ramirez? - no, i don't. - you sure? - i don't know who killed him. - then what could you have told that old prospector but didn't? [gun cocks] - all right. about the dynamite. - dynamite? - there. you got it out of me. cassidy sent you to find out if you could. tell him i never asked to handle the gol-darn stuff. mr. kilgore ordered it. why can't he order things like that right there in his own town, right there in brasada? what's all the big secret about? [dramatic music] ♪ [drumming] ♪ - tonto, those drums are summoning the tribes to war. - that plenty bad, kemo sabay. ranchers talk war all time. indians make ready. soon war start, and they fight, fight. - not if we can stop them. - spirit mountain talk, kemo sabay
country, of abuses of government. during the civil rights era, the government snooped on activists. during the vietnam era, the government snooped on antiwar protesters. in a digital age where computers can process billions of bits of information, we want the government to have unfettered access to every detail of our lives. from your visa statement, the government can determine what diseases you may or may not have, whether you're i am potent, manic, depressed, whether you're a gun owner, whether you buy ammunition, whether you're an animal rights activist, whether you're an environmental activist, what books you order, what blogs you read, what stores or internet sites you look at. do you really want your government to have free and unlimited access to everything you do on your computer? the fourth amendment was written in a different time and a different age, but its necessity and its truth are timeless. the right to privacy, and for that matter, the right to private property are not explicitly mentioned in the constitution, but the ninth amendment says that the rights not stated are no
. craig rights in the civil war at sea the naval forces did not determine the outcome of the civil war to the north would have won the war might even without the naval supremacy. but the naval forces affected its trajectory and very likely its length and that in the end was important enough. jim goes a little bit further, and i quote, to say the union army won the civil war would still the case much too strongly but it is accurate to say that couldn't have been without the contribution of the navy. we will let you fight it out on some future arena. but i will end officially by pointing something not be heard about this problem that they had with each other and these gentlemen are such good colleagues to me and each other jim mcpherson calls him the civil war at sea in his official appraisal and an outstanding study of the union and confederate navy and he calls his war on the water in importance story written with an eloquent him. so we have a quandary in the tough economic times. [laughter] a choice to be made. how to do it i found the perfect which to ask. the editor of the magazine
to the family. that's one whole aspect in any sort of civil war type situation, which it really is right now. you have the criminalization of society in many ways from people who are trying to make a living possible, and then you have groups that become invested in the civil war and the continuing of the civil war you saw something similar in lebanon. i wrote a piece recently in monitor called the lebanonizeation of syria, and unfarmly, of the many scenarios that could occur, in syria, because it does seem to be -- there's no easy answer. there is absolutely no easy answer to this. american intervention is not the answer. and i would be happy to talk more about that perhaps in the q & a session. what happened in -- what will happen probably in syria, unless the equation on one side or the ice dramatically changed. you have this balance of forces almost where neither side has the wherewithal to land the knockout punch and both sides think they can win and it's very difficult to intervene with any sort of negotiated solution with both sides think they can win. and when this happens in such a g
the general peace in the world, we've got to act, as we must act right now to try to end the civil war in syria, where 40,000 people have died. we can't just stay at home. >> axelrod: do you think people look at the notion of peace and say, "look, peace is wonderful, it's noble, it's terrific for us to aspire to, but i'll talk to you about peace after i feel safe." >> it's not a binary choice, peace or security. you have to have both. but a great society will always remind itself that in the final analysis, our greatness will be determined by whether or not we're striving for peace. that's why we rate lincoln and washington and martin luther king and franklin delano roosevelt as among the greatest leaders we ever had, because they all stood for peace especially when times were very, very difficult. >> axelrod: you mentioned a number of politicians that you could tick off as pursuing peace a generation ago. are there a similar list of politicians to mention now? >> it's hard to find sitting presidents and prime ministers who are saying to their people, "my overriding goal is peace in ou
quantities at all. patti ann: well, right. and as you mentioned, this is a civil war. >> yeah. patti ann: if assad exits, it's far from over. there are various possible outcomes here. do you see the rebels, though, being able to forge some kind of a government that can work with itself? >> it's possible, but within the rebel factions there are over 4,000 foreign fighters. their loyalty is to jihad. they're there as jihadists just as they were to al-qaeda in iraq. when they were killing americans. so they're not, their interest is not in the future of syria. their interest is in the future of an islamist state. so that's why if anybody gets in there, the deal has to be -- and assad needs to make this deal with someone who he thinks can honor it -- we need to lock down those weapons first and have a presence of we'll call it an adult country rather than the civil war participantsdividing the spoils of that very lucrative arms cache. patti ann: yeah. what is the likelihood that a non-islamist state, a more democratic type of government will emerge from all of this? >> well, that's very diff
believe that our civil liberties and our right to privacy need to be protected, and i do not believe that they're sufficiently protected under the current law. and so, simply extending current law for five more years is irresponsible, and it's not a rephrebg shun of our -- reflection of our values. there are few ways this bill falls short and i'm especially concerned about the practice of reverse targeting. the deputy majority leader talked about it about an hour ago. the intelligence community does not need a warrant to conduct surveillance on someone located overseas, and i think we can all agree there is no problem there. the problem comes when the intelligence committee conducts surveillance on someone overseas where the real purpose is to gain information about someone right here in america. that can happen without a warrant, and we should not let that happen without a warrant. our national security is not threatened if we require this information to be tagged and sequestered and subject to judicial review. it would merely ensure that the information intercepted overseas in the
, media conglomerates compete with one another to shock, violate and offend every standard of civilized society. by bringing an even more fox tick mix -- toxic mix or reckless behavior and criminal cruelty right into our homes every minute, every day, every hour of every single year. a child growing up in america today witnesses 16,000 murders and 200,000 acts of violence by the time he or she reaches the ripe old age of 18. and throughout it all, too many in the national media, their corporate owners and their stockholders act as silent enablers, if not complicit co-conspirators. rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonize gun owners. [inaudible conversations] >> the reckless behavior coming from the nra! the nra has blood on its hands! the nra has blood on its hands! shame on the nra! ban assault weapons now! ban assault weapons now! nra, ban assault weapons now! stop killing our children! stop the reckless behavior of the nra! we need gun control now! >> rather than face their own moral failings, the media demonize lawful gun owners, amplify their cries for more law
whitney. marva whitney, as we turn, died this weekend at the age of 68. we go back right now to mara verheyden-hilliard, executive director of the partnership for civil justice fund the released documents showing how the fbi monitored occupy wall street. i want to turn to one of the documents. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with juan gonzalez. part of a memo from the at the ipods field office from jacksonville, florida. the document is titled "domain program management domestic terrorism." is shows the fbi was concerned the occupy movement -- areascument cites certain of concern in central florida where -- you talk about this idea of the lone offender threat? >> i think that is very much botched checking by the fbi. there documents show they did not believe this was a movement that posed a threat of violence. throughout the documents, they're using their counter- terrorism resources and counter- terrorism authorities, defining the movement as domestic terrorism and potentially criminal in nature. the fact is, they also say throug
on the same but we put them on it and you're probably in the next genraition of those radios right now and by the way -- there was a man here who preceded the mayor. it was then called the chief administrative officer and rudy rothenberg and incredible civil servant and i worked with him on this building. in fact i drew this building. i had architecture work as a midship man and if i find it i'm going to give it to you. we also as a result of that we subsumed the departm
of those radios right now and by the way -- there was a man here who preceded the mayor. it was then called the chief administrative officer and rudy rothenberg and incredible civil servant and i worked with him on this building. in fact i drew this building. i had architecture work as a midship man and if i find it i'm going to give it to you. we also as a result of that we subsumed the department of public health ambulance into the fire department and should have been done years ago and we centralized 911 upstairs. it was a great ride. in addition to the people i mentioned there were scores of others that helped me to succeed kronenberg was one of these people to help me when the political system was going on and i am particularly indebted to the usual suspects, the san francisco suspects who come forward when you have problems and help you to fix them, and i will end with that because they make a difference, and i will end with that, and i brought something with me i want to show you. that's the emergency plan that i as the first all hazards emergency plan that
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with
civil commitment. >> professor. >> i'm going to add, do this a little bit shorter, i think, which is let's start with a question to everybody in the audience. all right, so if you like chocolate cake, raise your left hand. if you do not like chocolate cake, raise your right hand. all people who like chocolate cake left hand, don't like chocolate cake right hand. all right, hands down. how many people found it difficult to raise your hand by yourself? not very many. great, you made a choice. you thought about it. you decided and you acted. and my concept of what free will is the ability to act consistent with your preferences and desires. just that simple. now how many people here feel like you have control over whether or not you like chocolate cake? raise either hands. fewer, right. so there are two different things going on that we often conflate when we talk about free will. one is your predispositions to preferences and desires, ok. that may be impulsivity, that may be violence, that may be anti-social personality disorder, that may be a preference for chocolate cake, a preference fo
in a military environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you
, instead of trying to have more civil discussions like this one about how we can get to solve our problems. >> all right, karl, nighty and nice? >> yeah, joe is always in the ethereal big things. i am in little things. naughty list. all people who want to ban nativity display in public. santa will give them coal dust, not even coal. nice, gosh dang it, thank goodness for guys that made the "sky fall" movie. great movie. steven spielberg is going to hate to hear this coming from me, a big liberal. i'm not. but he did a wonderful job the "lincoln" movie and great entertainment for the families in the holiday season. nice, "lincoln" and "sky fall." naughty, scrooges who want to deny christmas. >> all right. even the whiteboard on christmas eve. merry christmas, guys. thank you very much. doug, back to you. >> doug: all right. white board with no numbers. thank you, bret. coming up next, the inside story behind romney's loss. fox all-stars will discuss the latest report. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually li
. the state department says it regrets this decision along with russia's new restrictions on civil society organizations that work with mile-per-hour partners. the adoption law is really believed -- american partners. the adoption law is really believed is in some way linked to other human rights violators from traveling to the states and freezes their assets. some say you can't link the two laws. translator: i think this law is absolutely outrageous and despicable. this is a law that punishes russian children for $230 million stolen by russian bureaucrats. >> reporter: this boy is the son of a woman with disabilities in russia and the american family that is about to finalize an adoption with him may be his last chance for a home. >> now in our son's case 22 families, russian families, came to see him and rejected him because of his bloodline. >> reporter: there are dozens of russian children already in the final stages of the process of adoption by american families, many of whom have already jumped through several hoops to prove to the russians that they are fit parents. the u.s. gov
, whatever you want to call them and everyone complains we don't use the exact right term, you we you will a know what i'm talking about, where you can spray bullets and kill 20 people in a minute. this is not the way a civilized society should operate. >> funny you mention that because on friday, the n.r.a.'s wayne laperriere said exactly we need more gun training and more guards and all of these things. i guarantee he that part of the press conference and statement won't get covered at all. i think that the media do have an anti-gun agenda and doesn't follow policies at all and have it on their own and all other ways to deal with scoot shootings and mass violence will be sunk below the radar. >> and the run knives, why don't we outlaw lives and they don't do mass killings with knives. >> why not outlaw mental illness-- >> we know what the solutions are, we've discussed them for years. >> i don't know-- >> no, no, we can make it hard tower kill that many people in a minute. we can do that. as the president said and i think taking note of and worth covering, we can do better. >> i thi
. the also the civil war, unrest going on in syria. >> right. i see these various crises in the middle east and you named two of the most serious but adding what is happening in libya, in yemen and elsewhere, adding continuing threat of iran's nuclear weapons program, it support for terrorist groups like hamas and hezbollah, i could see all of these crises spinning together and the entire region growing out of control while the united states acts almost as if it is a bystander. this is unprecedented in recent decades to have such a weak, feckless in fact, u.s. role in the region. heather: do you see any change taking effect? >> well, i don't think so honestly. i don't think, for example the nomination of john kerry to be secretary of state or whomever the nominee for a new secretary of defense turns out to be, i don't see them changing the basic direction of obama's administration policy. i think this course we've been on in the past four years is directly attributable to the president himself. i think that will continue into his second term. in fact i would say, now that he is safely reele
distribution based on "free will or volitional control" which applies on the civil side and used to apply under the a.l.i. test and now we have a new distribution of being able to distinguish right from wrong. so now we have two completely different distributions that we're drawing that bright line on. >> competent versus volitional. we can decide that cognitive isn't sufficient, but it is the basis where we draw the line. sorry. >> ok. so to get back to the science, do you see how the research that you're doing and this imaging and identification of areas in the brain that may be part of primarily psychopathy which we're talking about today, how would that be used in the courtroom? what is your opinion? >> classically individuals who have those trades, the lack of empathy, those traits predict future recidivism. if you're an offender and scored very high on those traits, you have a four to eight times increased risk of reoffending when released if you're an inmate. it is an construct on a future dangerness issue and used in risk assessment. the literature has done, it has helped us to understa
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